Birdnerd.co.uk
Information on Birdwatching Walks in Britain
 
  Swinemoor Common
Menu
Home
Birding Walks
Wildlife Books
Other Features
Contact
My Other Webpages
 
Recommended
Statistics

Visitors since 02/07/07
Sponsored Links
Some Useful Pages

 

 

 
 Swinemoor Common 
  Swinemoor Common is one of the three ancient commons of Beverley, East Yorkshire. Swinemoor is an area of seasonally flooded, species rich, semi improved grassland and has remained unploughed for hundreds of years; I have been visiting it since 2004. There are also areas of hawthorn scrub and ephemeral pools along with some mature hedgerows. The River Hull forms the common's eastern boundary and a large drainage ditch runs through its centre.
 
How to get to Swinemoor Common

 

To the east of Beverley; take the A 1035 towards Bridlington and Hornsea. Just before Hull Bridge, turn right into a dead end running parallel to the main road and park. Walk south along the public footpath along the River Hull. There is open access to the common but keep to the edges to avoid disturbing the birds. Alternatively, walk onto the common from Swinemoor Lane.

Beverley is about 10 miles north of Kingston-upon-Hull: it is served by train and is on the main bus route from York to Hull.

 
Birdwatching at Swinemoor Common 

Swinemoor is best visited in late winter and spring when large parts of the common are flooded and it used by both resident and passage waterbirds. In late winter, large flocks of Golden Plover, Lapwing and Black-headed Gulls roost here and as spring migration gets underway a good variety of migrants pass through.

1. In spring, a few pairs of Lapwings usually succesfully rear chicks and up to 6 male Snipe can be seen and heard drumming over the eastern part of the common.

 
Northern Lapwing
 

Other waders that pass through every spring are Black-tailed Godwit, Greenshank, Common Redshank, Little Ringed Plover, Ruff, Dunlin Whimbrel and Wood Sandpiper. Other species of note that stop here on their migratory route are Yellow Wagtail, Wheatear, Shelduck and Garganey and good numbers of Skylark, Meadow Pipit, Reed warbler and Sedge Warbler are present throughout the summer.

2. In the hawthorn scrub large numbers of summer warblers can be found. Willow Warbler breeds in good numbers and Lesser Whitethroat is quite common; Tree Sparrows can often be found amongst the trees on this part of the common.

Swinemoor Common is not frequented by a large number of birdwatchers and its importance to passage migrants is only just starting to be appreciated. I am sure if more people were to visit the total of 85 species that I know to have been recorded there would be greatly increased: I have personally seen 82 species at Swinemoor Common.

Also, see my Dartford Waffler blog where there are many entries for Swinemoor Common.

 
 Other Wildlife 

Marsh Frogs breed in the Beverley-Barmston drain and can be heard calling throughout the spring and into early summer.

The botanical interest of Swinemoor is considerable with a good number of grass and sedge species present as well as plenty of flowering plants such as Creeping Buttercup, Lesser Celandine and Cuckoo Flower. Both Bee and Green-winged Orchids have been recorded in recent years.

 
Cuckoo Flower Cardemine pratensis
(Photo from Nick Upton's Royalty Free Photos)
 
Species recorded at Swinemoor Common
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Black-tailed Godwit
Blue Tit
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Collared Dove
Common Sandpiper
Common Tern
Coot
Cormorant
Cuckoo
Curlew
Curlew Sandpiper
Dunlin
Dunnock
Fieldfare
Gadwall
Garganey
Golden Plover
Goldfinch
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Green Sandpiper
Greenfinch
Greenshank
Grey Heron
Greylag Goose
Grey Plover
Herring Gull
House Martin
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lapwing
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Grebe
Little Ringed Plover
Little Stint
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Mute Swan
Oystercatcher
Pectoral Sandpiper
Pheasant
Pied Wagtail
Red-legged Partridge
Redshank
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Reed Warbler
Ring Ouzel
Robin
Rock Dove (Feral Pigeon)
Rook
Ruff
Sand Martin
Sedge Warbler
Shelduck
Shoveler
Skylark
Snipe
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Spotted Redshank
Starling
Stock Dove
Swallow
Swift
Teal
Temminck's Stint
Tree Pipit
Tree Sparrow
Wheatear
Whimbrel
Whitethroat
Whooper Swan
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wood Sandpiper
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer
East Yorkshire Wildlife Links
East Riding Dragonflies - Everything about Dragonflies and Damselflies in East Yorkshire.
Flamborough Wildlife Group - Bird Observations from Flamborough Head.
North Cave Wetlands - All about the reserve.
Spurn Bird Observatory - Recent sightings and visitor information.
 
 
Google
 
Bird Fact

(Photo by Daniel Pettersson)
The collective noun for Skylarks is an "exaltation" a term dating from as far back as 1430.

Bird Feeder


Accommodation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
.

 
Birding Top 500 Counter

Copyright Birdnerd.co.uk 2007. All rights reserved