Birdnerd.co.uk
Information on Birdwatching Walks in Britain
 
  Figham Common
Menu
Home
Birding Walks
Wildlife Books
Other Features
Contact
 
Recommended
Statistics

Visitors since 02/07/07
Sponsored Links
Some Useful Pages

 

 

 
 Figham Common by Nick Upton 
 

Figham Common is one of the three ancient commons of Beverley, East Yorkshire. Figham Common is a mixture of permanently wet, rushy pasture, semi-improved grassland and hawthorn scrub which are criss-crossed by drainage ditches, with the River Hull forming the eastern boundary of the site. I have been visiting Figham Common from winter 2005 and have found it surprising how many species can be found within walking distance of Bevereley town centre..

 
How to get to Figham Common
 

From Beverley Minster head east along Flemingate which becomes Beckside. One will see a canal with housing developments alongside - follow the main road round a bend and take the turning on the left immediately before a Somerfield petrol station; this is Waterside Road, it is a dead end and leads to Figham Common.

There is a small parking area at the end of Waterside Road, next to the River Hull: the stile leading onto Figham Common is directly ahead.

Beverley is about 10 miles north of Kingston-upon-Hull: it is served by train and is on the main bus route from York to Hull.

 
 Birdwatching at Figham Common 

Figham Common is best visited in winter when Barn Owl, winter thrushes, stonechat and winter finch flocks are present, and in late spring for common migrants such as Blackcap, Willow Warbler, Chiffchaff and Lesser Whitethroat.

1. A good view across the rushy pasture is available from the car park next to the river. Looking across the common, Barn Owls can often be seen hunting in the early morning and late afternoon and reeds alongside the River Hull are a good place search for an early Sedge Warbler or Reed Warbler.

 
Common Snipe
(Photo by Johan Svensson)
 

2. Hawthorn scrub in these areas are good places for finding Redwing and Fieldfare in winter along with good numbers of Yellowhammer all year round. Many other small passerines are present in this area including Goldcrest, Treecreeper and Long-tailed Tit.

3. An area of permanently wet rushes and reedmace is a good place to see up to 50 Snipe in the mid winter and as many as 20 Teal along with Mallard. A pair of Reed Buntings usually nest here and Sparrowhawks often hunt in this area.

4. The common is constantly wet and in winter holds Snipe and Jack Snipe. Scanning across the rushes in winter will often turn up Stonechat and Barn Owl with Short-eared Owl showing up in the coldest weather.

Also, see my Dartford Waffler blog where there are a number of entries for Figham Common.

 
Other Wildlife

Figham Common is not blessed with a great variety of other wildlife, although common wetland flora is plentiful with Hard Rush, Greater Reedmace and Cuckoo Flower all abundant. For those willing to look the grassland should hold a number of interesting species as it has not been ploughed for as long as 200 years.

Presumably there is a good population of voles here, given how often Barn Owls hunt over the common and rabbits are plentiful on the south western part of the site.

Common Frog and Common Toad are easily found when they emerge in early spring to spawn and Marsh Frogs call from the Beverley-Barmston drain into summer.

A good range of butterflies and other insects are present in summer.

 
Hawthorn in blossom
(Photo by Nick Upton)

 
Bird Species recorded at Figham Common
Barn Owl
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Blue Tit
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Collared Dove
Common Gull
Coot
Cormorant
Dunnock
Fieldfare
Gadwall
Goldcrest
Golden Plover
Goldeneye
Goldfinch
Great Tit
Greenfinch
Grey heron
Grey Partridge
Greylag Goose
Herring Gull
Jack Snipe
Jackdaw
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Grebe
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Mute Swan
Pheasant
Pied Wagtail
Redshank
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Robin
Rock Dove (Feral Pigeon)
Rook
Sand Martin
Sedge Warbler
Short-eared Owl
Skylark
Snipe
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Starling
Stock Dove
Stonechat
Swallow
Teal
Treecreeper
Tufted Duck
Whitethroat
Wigeon
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer
 
Figham Common Thumbnails (Click for larger versions)

 
East Yorkshire Wildlife Links
East Riding Dragonflies - Everything about Dragonflies and Damselflies in East Yorkshire.
Flamborough Wildlife Group - Bird Observations from Flamborough Head.
North Cave Wetlands - All about the reserve.
Spurn Bird Observatory - Recent sightings and visitor information.
 
 
Google
 
Bird Fact

(Photo by Andreas Trepte)
The Redwing breeds in birch and conifer forest as well as tudra in northern Europe and Asia. It is strongly migratory, moving south in the winter.

Bird Feeder


Accommodation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
.

 
Birding Top 500 Counter

Copyright Birdnerd.co.uk 2007. All rights reserved